Scout Design Ideas

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I would love a removeable Frunk mounted generator as an option. Most people wouldn't need it but would help with towing range and off-road range anxiety. Also nice for vehicle to home emergency power. The power attachment could be used in the future for better/more power dense battery tech that could realistically be like the "jerry cans" people keep bringing up. I don't believe current battery tech in something the size of a jerry can will get you more than a couple miles.
 
I would love a removeable Frunk mounted generator as an option. Most people wouldn't need it but would help with towing range and off-road range anxiety. Also nice for vehicle to home emergency power. The power attachment could be used in the future for better/more power dense battery tech that could realistically be like the "jerry cans" people keep bringing up. I don't believe current battery tech in something the size of a jerry can will get you more than a couple miles.
Agree but as tech catches up having a patent on battery Jerry can would be very cool.
 
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Just some design ideas for the new Scout...
The thing that former and current Scout owners love is the sense of freedom / airiness when the top is off like in the pic of this Scout 800
View attachment 22

Jeeps and Bronco’s used to have this sense of airiness in the previous versions but in the new versions shown below, because of the pillars / window tracks, it hardly feels that the top is off at all. The new Bronco does a better job of opening things up than the Jeep but it is still confining.
View attachment 23View attachment 24

If at all possible in your design journey on the new Scout, please try to keep the open air spirit of the original as much as possible. I know that safety dictates that there be occupant protection in case of a rollover incident, but it doesn’t have to be obtrusive the way the new Bronco or new Jeep are designed. Think minimalist with a rollbar like the pic of the Scout 80 below. Very good occupant protection but still very open and free to the sky.
View attachment 25

Just a thought on how to raise and lower side windows on a “minimalist” rollbar equipped 4 door Scout would be to look at the side window design of a mid 1960’s (’65) Lincoln Continental Convertible shown below. The side windows on it could be raised or lowered independently and the rear side window had a seal on its front edge that sealed against the back edge of the front side window to keep out wind / weather.
View attachment 26 View attachment 27
View attachment 28

My personal body style preference is the Scout II and if you could make a 4 door Traveler I'd be all over it, as I'm currently looking at the feasibility of adding rear doors on a '77 Traveler for practicality sake of getting passengers and gear in the back seat area. So the idea of the Continental windows converging together is what I'm looking to incorporate in the Traveler.
Todd (TA_n_TN)

PS. I grew up 20 miles from the Fort Wayne, IN International Harvester Scout plant, so on behalf of all of us out here in “Scout Land” that grew up with Scouts, have owned Scouts, or just appreciate the history of this iconic brand, I want you to know how glad we are that this is coming back and that we are rooting for you and the rest of the Scout Motors Team!
I have to agree! I ha
Just some design ideas for the new Scout...
The thing that former and current Scout owners love is the sense of freedom / airiness when the top is off like in the pic of this Scout 800
View attachment 22

Jeeps and Bronco’s used to have this sense of airiness in the previous versions but in the new versions shown below, because of the pillars / window tracks, it hardly feels that the top is off at all. The new Bronco does a better job of opening things up than the Jeep but it is still confining.
View attachment 23View attachment 24

If at all possible in your design journey on the new Scout, please try to keep the open air spirit of the original as much as possible. I know that safety dictates that there be occupant protection in case of a rollover incident, but it doesn’t have to be obtrusive the way the new Bronco or new Jeep are designed. Think minimalist with a rollbar like the pic of the Scout 80 below. Very good occupant protection but still very open and free to the sky.
View attachment 25

Just a thought on how to raise and lower side windows on a “minimalist” rollbar equipped 4 door Scout would be to look at the side window design of a mid 1960’s (’65) Lincoln Continental Convertible shown below. The side windows on it could be raised or lowered independently and the rear side window had a seal on its front edge that sealed against the back edge of the front side window to keep out wind / weather.
View attachment 26 View attachment 27
View attachment 28

My personal body style preference is the Scout II and if you could make a 4 door Traveler I'd be all over it, as I'm currently looking at the feasibility of adding rear doors on a '77 Traveler for practicality sake of getting passengers and gear in the back seat area. So the idea of the Continental windows converging together is what I'm looking to incorporate in the Traveler.
Todd (TA_n_TN)

PS. I grew up 20 miles from the Fort Wayne, IN International Harvester Scout plant, so on behalf of all of us out here in “Scout Land” that grew up with Scouts, have owned Scouts, or just appreciate the history of this iconic brand, I want you to know how glad we are that this is coming back and that we are rooting for you and the rest of the Scout Motors Team!
Excellent! I loved my old (as old as me) 2 door Blazer with the top. Scout needs this.
 
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An odd mixture I know, but my other automotive love is British sports cars. Next to my Scout II in my shop is a 1962 MGA that I am restoring. One of the common things they did back then was to make the hood, trunk lid and doors out of aluminum. While todays cars don't have the same rust issues in the bottom of doors as say the Scout did, this could still be a justifiable upgrade to help the new Scout stand the test of time. However, what really got me linking the two together was watching my son help my daughter take her Jeep doors off this past weekend. Would using aluminum in lieu of steel make removing the Scout doors a little less cumbersome by lightening the load? Figured I would throw it out there anyway.

Heck, use it as a marketing tool for Scout Motors, helping to protect the earth we all love exploring in these Scouts. "You can help build your Scout by sending X-number of crushed aluminum cans 🍻 to [insert your recycled aluminum suppliers address]. These cans sent in allow you to put your name as the original purchaser of this Scout on the line ticket, along with your beverage of choice that helped to build it.
 
F150 is all aluminum body. It is thicker gauge than the steel body was and somewhat lighter. More expensive to repair though. Good road salt corrosion resistance.
 
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One thing I'd say is because it will be an EV doesn't mean it has to look like an EV, or atleast the trend that I see. What I notice is many EVs are using additional lighting, mainly headlights to set their mark as being an EV. Examples include the lightning with the full light going across the front and Ram 1500 REV incorporated lighting into the ram logo. I feel that companies are over exaggerating their lighting into the EVs to prove that it is an EV.
 
One thing I'd say is because it will be an EV doesn't mean it has to look like an EV, or atleast the trend that I see. What I notice is many EVs are using additional lighting, mainly headlights to set their mark as being an EV. Examples include the lightning with the full light going across the front and Ram 1500 REV incorporated lighting into the ram logo. I feel that companies are over exaggerating their lighting into the EVs to prove that it is an EV.
I completely, completely agree and have also commented about that on this forum. Just keep it simple and classy.
 
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I'm hearing that Scout is developing a truck and an SUV. My thought on this is that every Scout should have the ability to be both. I have had many Scouts over the years but one thing was true of them all (Scout 80 and Scout II's) I had a truck top and a full top. I could haul friends and I could switch tops and remove the back seat to haul rocks, lumber, trees etc.

With today's innovative designers, you could easily build back seats that fold into the bed and a bulkhead that comes up. You could also make a singular, customizable top. This is a chance to make the most revolutionary vehicle to date. We could have a family offroader and a work truck all in one. I believe the spirit of the original Scout was utility and versatility.

Instead of a truck and an SUV, I would break it into three size classes paying homage to the original three sizes (80/800, Scout II, Traveler). All three sizes would be a truck and an SUV.

The reason I still drive my 65' Scout 80 is because I could never decide between a new truck or a new SUV. I need both but only want one vehicle.

P8544-International-Harvester-Scouts-11-x-14_792x1008.jpg
 
I'm hearing that Scout is developing a truck and an SUV. My thought on this is that every Scout should have the ability to be both. I have had many Scouts over the years but one thing was true of them all (Scout 80 and Scout II's) I had a truck top and a full top. I could haul friends and I could switch tops and remove the back seat to haul rocks, lumber, trees etc.

With today's innovative designers, you could easily build back seats that fold into the bed and a bulkhead that comes up. You could also make a singular, customizable top. This is a chance to make the most revolutionary vehicle to date. We could have a family offroader and a work truck all in one. I believe the spirit of the original Scout was utility and versatility.

Instead of a truck and an SUV, I would break it into three size classes paying homage to the original three sizes (80/800, Scout II, Traveler). All three sizes would be a truck and an SUV.

The reason I still drive my 65' Scout 80 is because I could never decide between a new truck or a new SUV. I need both but only want one vehicle.

View attachment 2052
I agree, but I think the issue becomes the fact it will be a 4 door. That makes for a really short bed, or a long wheel base that most on here want to avoid with the SUV version. The multiple options was a great feature of the original Scout! ....would be cool to see it return
 
I'm hearing that Scout is developing a truck and an SUV. My thought on this is that every Scout should have the ability to be both. I have had many Scouts over the years but one thing was true of them all (Scout 80 and Scout II's) I had a truck top and a full top. I could haul friends and I could switch tops and remove the back seat to haul rocks, lumber, trees etc.

I fully support this idea, and would love a 2-door... but it appears 4-door is the direction they're heading, and where most of the customers are these days. Just look at how many 4-door broncos and wranglers you see on the road compared to their 2-door variants. This idea is still possible as a 4-door probably, just not as natural of a design.
 
I fully support this idea, and would love a 2-door... but it appears 4-door is the direction they're heading, and where most of the customers are these days. Just look at how many 4-door broncos and wranglers you see on the road compared to their 2-door variants. This idea is still possible as a 4-door probably, just not as natural of a design.
If we can put a man on the moon in the 60's we can solve this problem 🤣
 
I have made mention before that the possibility is there (with improvements in battery tech) to offer a proper two-door with a shorter wheelbase. For now the only commitment we've made in getting to market are four-door models to start.
Definitely good to keep in mind that the first models to market are just that: the first. I hope loyal Scouts don't despair that all design features on their lists are not met with the first models. I feel like this will just be the starting part and Scout will expand offerings and models as the years go on (and the tech improves, as you mentioned).
 
Definitely good to keep in mind that the first models to market are just that: the first. I hope loyal Scouts don't despair that all design features on their lists are not met with the first models. I feel like this will just be the starting part and Scout will expand offerings and models as the years go on (and the tech improves, as you mentioned).
I will add that many features can be added through OTA software updates. I truly hope that Scout is investing in a robust operating system that can receive easy upgrades and quick fixes/patches.
 
The new Scouts need a solid spot where you can kick the door open. Let me explain. We live on a mountainside, so it is almost impossible to park any vehicle on a level spot. When you are getting out of the uphill side you have a door to push open, and you hope that you can get it far enough on the first shove that the detent catches and keeps it open. Now add a few things in your hand so it's harder to push, so what do you do? You give it a shove with your foot. This isn't much of a problem with the Scout 80/800s with solid metal doors that are reasonably light (even without the detents), but all our modern vehicles have very heavy doors. And all our recent vehicles have a nice pocket down low on the door for a drink bottle or such. The tin plastic of that bottle bin isn't designed to take many kicks. So I sacrifice bottle storage for a block of 2x4 to support it while I push open a >50# door on a 7% slope. I figure regulations about crash resistance and air bags, etc. will make the new Scout's doors heavy, so I ask that some area down there between the speakers and bottle bins be made solid enough to take a push (kick) without breaking. // Conversely, for the downhill side doors which occasionally get away from us, it is essential that the hinge mounts be strong enough that the torque of that 50# door swinging hard against the hinge doesn't do damage. // BTW, this is not a problem limited to those of us lucky enough to live in the mountains, the winds I've experienced in the prairies pose identical problems.