Learn from the Bronco

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We like our bronco, waited almost two years for it and find it plenty powerful. It's our shared daily driver, we do offroading, dune buggying, and tow it behind our motor coach. Even through we opted for the lux package and leather, the interior is cool, but cheap.

I wish it polluted less and I grew up with a Scout 800. So, I'm hoping for a replacement for this in 2025/2026 that can do everything this does, but improves upon it in styling, rugged luxury and economy.

With Ford announcing using the new standard charging plug (Tesla), I expect that Scout follows suit.
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As a very happy 2 Door 2021 Bronco owner, I'm excited by the Scout mission. That being said if you build a box without a removable top of some sort you are not differentiating your product IMHO. The beauty of EVs is you can sacrifice some efficiency for design. If I had the Scout Pickup with removable top, every box would be checked for me. I can use the Bronco on long road trips, but for 90% of my driving I'd be using the Scout truck everyday and when I need to haul things which is like 2-3 times a year, I have a vehicle that can do that. I have an old F250 just sitting in the driveway for when we want to go kayaking or I need mulch or need to transport my Dirt Bikes. If the Scout truck has some sort of removable top, I will be buying one and getting rid of my Ford Pickup and my daily driver Lexus. I will meet my energy goals by using an EV 90% of the time and having fun at the same time. I'm so tired of looking at egg shaped teslas and KIA Evs, I respect the technology, but the desire for low drag has really made those designs boring IMHO. The cybertruck is an option, but I want some open air options so I'd prefer the Scout if it can achieve that.
 
Winch. Ford offered a factory installed winch for the Bronco Everglades but the design was not thought through. The heavy winch on the front messed with the balance of the vehicle so it could only be offered on vehicles with the smaller, lighter engine. The Scout should have an optional winch but it needs to be better designed, not just a after-market add-on but integrated in a way that adds as little weight as possible and perhaps with the heavy motor mounted further back.
Might it not be better for Scout to create a platform at both front and back where we could install our winch of choice? Just put a plug there to plug it in, that's how I handle the winch on my Tundra, I just added the plug with 8ga wires direct to the battery.
 
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Might it not be better for Scout to create a platform at both front and back where we could install our winch of choice? Just put a plug there to plug it in, that's how I handle the winch on my Tundra, I just added the plug with 8ga wires direct to the battery.
Certainly, integrating a winch into a vehicle requires careful consideration, as evident in the case of the Ford Bronco Everglades. The idea of offering a winch as an option for the Scout is intriguing, and your suggestion of creating a winch platform at both the front and back is a thoughtful approach.
The key to successful integration lies in addressing issues such as weight distribution and balance, as seen with the Everglades. Your proposal of providing a plug-in platform for the winch is practical, akin to your setup with the Tundra. This method not only simplifies the installation process but also allows users to customize their winch choice while ensuring a secure and reliable power connection with 8-gauge wires directly to the battery.
Moreover, considering the nature of off-road adventures and the potential need for recovery in challenging terrains, it's essential for the Scout's winch integration to be well-designed and not simply an after-market add-on. The suggestion to mount the heavy motor further back is a step in the right direction to maintain optimal weight distribution.
trail bike Incorporating your proposal could make the Scout a versatile choice for off-road enthusiasts who value customization and functionality. And, in the spirit of adventure, it would be interesting to explore how this integrated winch platform could benefit users who also enjoy activities such as , offering a comprehensive solution for various outdoor pursuits.
 
I think the world needs smaller vehicles in general. So this would be great. I canceled my R1S pre-order because I realized it was way more vehicle than I really needed even though it's amazing. The Ford Maverick is killing it because there is still demand for the small but utility-focused vehicle. Plus it's way easier to get into the garage or park it.
Size or lack of oversize is tantamount. Bronco-Defender-discovery- Pathfinder-wrangler-are a better size than Explorer-Grand Wagoneer. As an expansion size, sure. And even a smaller Sport size might fit the bill. And for trucks the oversized Colorado should be the limit. Use Ridgeline as a benchmark
 
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I really, really like the look of the new two door Bronco! So much like an early Scout 80/800. They are totally under powered and really poor MPG for all the progress we have made. I have an 07 Toyota FJ Cruiser that is close enough that it makes no sense to swap vehicles.

If you can bring the tech to the heritage then it's game on.
How can you say the Bronco is underpowered? Especially since you’re comparing it to a 16 year old Toyota with an outdated truly underpowered V6 with half the speeds in the trans? I just can’t see that. As a previous owner of a 78 Scout II TERRA 4x4 Special Edition I bought new back in the daze? I will only buy a new one IF it’s at least a plug in hybrid! I’m not buy an adventure vehicle with a n electric limited range. Give us a small 3.0 diesel/Hybrid. Just imagine a 3.0 DuraMax, plug in with a 15 gal tank with 30 miles of battery power, at a reasonable 20 mpg that’s 330-480 miles.
 
How can you say the Bronco is underpowered? Especially since you’re comparing it to a 16 year old Toyota with an outdated truly underpowered V6 with half the speeds in the trans? I just can’t see that. As a previous owner of a 78 Scout II TERRA 4x4 Special Edition I bought new back in the daze? I will only buy a new one IF it’s at least a plug in hybrid! I’m not buy an adventure vehicle with a n electric limited range. Give us a small 3.0 diesel/Hybrid. Just imagine a 3.0 DuraMax, plug in with a 15 gal tank with 30 miles of battery power, at a reasonable 20 mpg that’s 330-480 miles.
Sorry to hear you are disappointed. It’s been clearly stated EV only so at this point in planning unless you can rig up a diesel generator in the frunk you will be stuck with an EV. If encourage you to read some threads by those on the forum that have been running Rivian and are very pleased with their off-road capability. We are all learning on the forum. We all dreamt of a modern day ICE Scout but it isn’t in the plans. Take the time to read and like many of us you may learn there are a lot of advantages OR buy a RAM or a Bronco or other ICE UV.
Anything in the search with Rivian or posted from @R1TVT should be enlightening. If you are 100% ICE or hybrid then nothing on here will help change your mind. Good luck and happy searching
 
Certainly, integrating a winch into a vehicle requires careful consideration, as evident in the case of the Ford Bronco Everglades. The idea of offering a winch as an option for the Scout is intriguing, and your suggestion of creating a winch platform at both the front and back is a thoughtful approach.
The key to successful integration lies in addressing issues such as weight distribution and balance, as seen with the Everglades. Your proposal of providing a plug-in platform for the winch is practical, akin to your setup with the Tundra. This method not only simplifies the installation process but also allows users to customize their winch choice while ensuring a secure and reliable power connection with 8-gauge wires directly to the battery.
Moreover, considering the nature of off-road adventures and the potential need for recovery in challenging terrains, it's essential for the Scout's winch integration to be well-designed and not simply an after-market add-on. The suggestion to mount the heavy motor further back is a step in the right direction to maintain optimal weight distribution.
trail bike Incorporating your proposal could make the Scout a versatile choice for off-road enthusiasts who value customization and functionality. And, in the spirit of adventure, it would be interesting to explore how this integrated winch platform could benefit users who also enjoy activities such as , offering a comprehensive solution for various outdoor pursuits.
I believe the answer is as simple as having a 2" receiver at each end of vehicle, with an appropriate plug be it Anderson, Hella or NATO; sufficient gauge and fused for a winch. Most important might be for the front where people might leave the winch for extended periods is either relocating or positioning the front sensors so that a front winch does not block the sensor field of view.

Why a front 2" receiver? In addition to a winch? Boat yards like to see the boat they are putting in the water. Light duty snow plow. How about even ousting a front adjustable bracket to dupport canoes, kayaks, tall Christmas trees
 
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I believe the answer is as simple as having a 2" receiver at each end of vehicle, with an appropriate plug be it Anderson, Hella or NATO; sufficient gauge and fused for a winch. Most important might be for the front where people might leave the winch for extended periods is either relocating or positioning the front sensors so that a front winch does not block the sensor field of view.

Why a front 2" receiver? In addition to a winch? Boat yards like to see the boat they are putting in the water. Light duty snow plow. How about even ousting a front adjustable bracket to dupport canoes, kayaks, tall Christmas trees
I'd love a 2" receiver front and back.
 
Sorry to hear you are disappointed. It’s been clearly stated EV only so at this point in planning unless you can rig up a diesel generator in the frunk you will be stuck with an EV. If encourage you to read some threads by those on the forum that have been running Rivian and are very pleased with their off-road capability. We are all learning on the forum. We all dreamt of a modern day ICE Scout but it isn’t in the plans. Take the time to read and like many of us you may learn there are a lot of advantages OR buy a RAM or a Bronco or other ICE UV.
Anything in the search with Rivian or posted from @R1TVT should be enlightening. If you are 100% ICE or hybrid then nothing on here will help change your mind. Good luck and happy searching
Rivian's R1T just took first place at the Rebelle Rallye, albeit with hydrogen generators recharging the vehicle every night, but impressive none the less.

I think the reality of EV offroading and overlanding means you need to find some way to generate power off grid.

Rather than traditional generators, I'd like to see a fuel agnostic generator built off of Cosworth's cat gen. Much more efficient than a standard generator and generates 35kW at a fuel consumption rate of 1.4 gal/hr. (5 gal Jerry can delivers 125kWh)

A few companies have tried tonneaus, roofs, and other accessories with PV cells, though I don't think anybody has done it in a compelling or successful way other than EcoFlow and other smaller battery producers who have some deployable PV options.
 
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One of the most important things to consider when reading these comments (as it relates to SM, and the company's future long-term viability) is that there is a tremendous amount of chatter around edge-cases for the Scout. That is great stuff, as a lot of that dialog and discussion can impact design considerations & drive innovative features. Or, allow designers to make considerations for owners to customize their own vehicles (with things like a 2" receiver for example). I believe it is unfair to think that a new company that is re-launching a vehicle on an entirely new platform with a completely electric powertrain will accommodate everyone, or build-out every feature under the sun to support something like overlanding for example, that is just not realistic. There are plenty of aftermarket companies out there that will develop parts and systems to allow for modifications, provided SM makes accommodations for some of these things (while maintaining safety of occupants & other drivers)

Scout will sell MANY, MANY more vehicles to daily drivers. Whether you like it or not, there are plenty of Rivian or Bronco mall-crawlers... All HIGHLY CAPABLE vehicles that may never even see a rutted dirt road. Sorry, but that is the reality. And the reality for any automotive company to survive and thrive is to sell more vehicles (also a big driver for a backer like VW with skin in the game). I have 23,510 miles on my R1T. In May, I will have owned the truck for 2 years and will have about 30K EV miles. If I want, I can wake up everyday with 300 miles of range and never hit a gas station of course. Do I need to charge up nightly? No - not for daily driving. And while there is absolutely nothing wrong with those that want a rock-crawler or rally truck that is a niche use case for any vehicle - be it a Jeep, Bronco, Land Rover, or a R1T. Personally, I use my truck "as a truck" - I load it with gear, I fill the bed with firewood, leaves and branches, I tow a boat (best towing vehicle I have ever owned BTW), and I do some light off-roading.

I don't need a generator here, but I could certainly benefit from more superchargers in the Northeast when heading North. For now, I plan ahead and re-charge BEFORE reaching a back road or out of the way adventure destination. Eventually, we'll see more infrastructure for EV's in Nat'l parks, ski areas, and more remote destinations. But for those that want edge case functionality options like this do exist, they just aren't cheap!:

If people don't want an EV, and as has been noted above, they don't need to buy one and there are plenty of other options. Personally, I can't wait to see what SM drops with the first launch. Given the way my R1T performs and the SW Updates I have rec'd since taking ownership, the future is looking very bright. One reason why I am here is b/c my R1T is not perfect, and I did not expect it to be. It has exceeded my expectations in so many ways that I don't think I could buy another gas truck.
 
LOL - you would be surprised. There are new non-leather materials that wear better than leather (for example) that are really good. Plus the recycled fibers can be died into splendid plaids as you pointed out. We'll be good. 🍻

Is it too much to ask that I want my seats lined and door panels lined in real panda?
Seriously though... I have one Scout getting full leather interior included headliner, and trying to get the seat backs done with GATOR dorsal, WITH the scutes!!
What is a vegan?
 
Ford got a lot right with the Bronco. The extremely high demand and long wait times for the Bronco, despite it underpowered, inefficient and polluting engines are indicative of this.

The Scout needs to be a real off-roader that goes toe to toe with a Wrangler or Bronco. That means at least matching the off road capability as well as having a removable roof and doors.

Keep it simple. The Bronco’s removable roof that also allows for roof bars is almost perfect, and versatile with multiple roof options. There’s no need to give electric cars futuristic styling, that all looks bad, just keep it classic like Ford did with the Bronco.

Keeping it simple will also help to keep the price competitive with the Bronco and Wrangler.

If the design team are not off road enthusiasts that also understand the after-market for customizing off roaders they may as well just give up. For example, sensor placement needs to take into account that off road enthusiasts are going to switch out the bumper with some after-market one. Get this stuff right and they will love the Scout.

The design team needs to thoroughly understand for example what makes the Bronco a great off roader and the Defender a poor one. This would include the fact that the Defender has very high pressure, rather low profile tires on large rims that do not perform well when aired down - small wheels with big tires and a bead-lock option are the way to go even if they don’t appeal to city buyers.

If you want to know what to make just watch a ton of YouTube videos of Wrangler and Bronco enthusiasts nit-picking about how their vehicles could be slightly better.

If only the Bronco was electric I would buy one in a heartbeat. There’s no sign that Ford are making an electric Bronco. That gives Scout a window of opportunity to take a market that has not yet been served by electric. Rivian have largely failed to serve this market because they were obsessed with competing against Tesla when they should have been focussed on the actual off road world.
I think you hit a lot of important details in your thread here. I do have a new 2 door bronco and would love to see Scout absolutely nail it with bringing it back. They have to really get it right though. A 2 door option if it's also planned to be a 4 door, removable top and integrated roll cage. Bronco did a good job to get the roll bar integrated nicely. The bronco v6 is a powerful motor but electric torq could be awesome in the Scout. I would have no problem selling my bronco for a Scout if they get the new build right.
 
They got a lot right, but I don't like the flares sticking straight out or the front tie downs. I think it needs a grill surround and what's the deal with the bar on the headlights.
 
They got a lot right, but I don't like the flares sticking straight out or the front tie downs. I think it needs a grill surround and what's the deal with the bar on the headlights.
I can't comment much on the Broncos as I've not seen one up close yet, but the bar in the headlights is just part of a widespread design trend. It is quite clear that since the LED became the goto "lightbulb" because of it's longevity, size, flexibility, and minimal cost all the automotive designers have had a field day in creating new light layouts. A few, Kia with the square surrounds, Rivian with the vertical bathtubs, Porche with it's Four Point Principle, and Bronco with the bar, seem to have settled on them like trademarks as much as the portholes in the hoods of old Buicks, and rear stripes on Pontiacs. I kinda like the Bronco circle&bar design, there are many which are far worse on/to my eyes. With the current situation of federal regulations forcing near-homogenous design on anything called a SUV the designers have to find something to say "here comes a ______" and the lights are about the most noticeable feature that's identifiable from any distance. I hope the SM designers find something simple and distinctive that they can stick with over the years.
 
I can't comment much on the Broncos as I've not seen one up close yet, but the bar in the headlights is just part of a widespread design trend. It is quite clear that since the LED became the goto "lightbulb" because of it's longevity, size, flexibility, and minimal cost all the automotive designers have had a field day in creating new light layouts. A few, Kia with the square surrounds, Rivian with the vertical bathtubs, Porche with it's Four Point Principle, and Bronco with the bar, seem to have settled on them like trademarks as much as the portholes in the hoods of old Buicks, and rear stripes on Pontiacs. I kinda like the Bronco circle&bar design, there are many which are far worse on/to my eyes. With the current situation of federal regulations forcing near-homogenous design on anything called a SUV the designers have to find something to say "here comes a ______" and the lights are about the most noticeable feature that's identifiable from any distance. I hope the SM designers find something simple and distinctive that they can stick with over the years.
I think part of the Bronco is just a modern twist on the originals. They just slid the signal indicators outward to intersect the round lights
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Carpet. The Bronco and some other off-roaders have rubberized floors with drain plugs. Carpet is very difficult to clean, all vehicles should ditch it in favor of rubberized floors. I know it dampens cabin noise but ’easy to clean’ should be a much higher priority and there are other ways to reduce cabin noise. The question of “how do I clean this?” is a pragmatic design consideration that industrial designers often overlook. The designers of an off-roader need to ask this question over and over again. An off road vehicle is often likely to get a thick layer of dust on internal surfaces and needs to be easy to clean inside and out.
Maybe a better way is snap in/snap out carpet that can be removed in a minute to pull out to either clean, upgrade, or remove in advance of dirty work. This would allow you to have plush carpet when you're running around town, but be able to pop them out ahead of a trip to the hills/etc.
 
Maybe a better way is snap in/snap out carpet that can be removed in a minute to pull out to either clean, upgrade, or remove in advance of dirty work. This would allow you to have plush carpet when you're running around town, but be able to pop them out ahead of a trip to the hills/etc.
If this option is available, it would be a short step to offer a parallel version in tough plastic (ex: WeatherTech) that would attach in the same way.