American Made

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sambown

Active member
1st Year Member
Aug 23, 2023
61
88
Deer Park, Washington
Back when the news was first announced that VW would be producing a new scout I was uninterested because it was not going to be an IH product.

A bit about me: I have owned a 79 scout II, which my dad and I restored in high school. My dad has owned 9+ scouts since I have been alive (I am 25). I grew up on the trails and in the garage in these, the smell of gas immediately makes me think of the backseat of a Scout. My dad was former president of the local scout clubs, and we still attend the big events every year. I have an IH tractor I restored in college, and I want an IH 1456 FWA tractor soon enough.

Part of the reason my dad and I loved these old vehicles is because they were American-made. Nothing against anything imported, I have plenty of friends who love their imports and I think they are quite cool- but I get a great sense of pride owning a vehicle that is from here. Everything I buy is American made - clothes, shoes, silverware, glassware, my mattress, toothbrush, vehicles, anything I buy, and that is because of growing up and feeding off my dads passion for the American-made scout.

Fun fact about the originals - everything from the mines, to the casting factories, to the assembly line was (for the most-part) owned by International Harvester. So the Scout was American steel, from American mines, built by American hands.

Once I found out the scout was going to be made here again, I was immediately interested. I have nothing against VW at all, my wife's dream car is an old 60s van, but to stay true to it's heritage, I think the scout should try their best to be independent. Meaning their own branded owner's manuals, logos, decals, etc. No VW on the car, especially since Scout Motors is technically operating as their own company. When I read a Motortrend review in 2027, I want to see the Scout Motor's Scout.... not the VW Scout.

I cannot speak for anyone else on this forum, but I know that the people that attend the local scout club in eastern Washington (at least most of the original members from 20+ years ago) would agree with this. A lot of them have worked for International, then Navistar. A lot of them own old IH products that are not scouts (tractors, cream separators, hit-n-miss engines, M1's, hand-tools, refrigerators, etc.). IH has it's own legacy that I hope Scout Motor's tries to continue.

Additionally, I like how proud the new Ford Bronco is to be built in America. My dad has a 2-door sasquatch. It has an American-flag on the shifter, it has a sticker on the windshield that says "Built with Pride at the Michigan Assembly Plant", and it has the VIN plate near the center-console, which says "Made in Detroit, Michigan USA" on it.

These are the kinds of things I hope Scout Motors does to separate themselves from VW. I know they are independent companies, like Fiat owned Chrysler and Ram and they were independent, and had no design correlations. But then again Ford owns Lincoln, and they use almost all of the same components for their cars.
 
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Scout Motors is an independent spinoff from VW and not under the VW brand.
 
Scout Motors is an independent spinoff from VW and not under the VW brand.
For sure. I just hope they take design cues from the Ford bronco and they are proud to be independent and American, and do not hesitate to do so because their parent company is not. I hope they respect more IH heritage than VW.
 
Thanks for the post and the history, such a fantastic story and one we have heard many times in our travels around the country meeting up with Scout owners.

Scout Motors is a U.S. corporation and essentially Volkswagen is our biggest investor to date. Like any company with investors, they like to know how we spend their money from time to time, but otherwise give Scout latitude to get this off the ground. All of us here are proud of the fact that we are an American company and will build our vehicles in Blythewood, South Carolina. There are numerous reasons and incentives to source as many parts and materials from the region as well.. Lastly we are respectful of the history, in awe of the legacy and couldn't be more proud to have the opportunity to bring the next-generation Scout to market.

This team just gets better and better every week. We can't wait to start showing some of the things we are working on.

Thanks again for the note! 🍻
 
Thanks for the post and the history, such a fantastic story and one we have heard many times in our travels around the country meeting up with Scout owners.

Scout Motors is a U.S. corporation and essentially Volkswagen is our biggest investor to date. Like any company with investors, they like to know how we spend their money from time to time, but otherwise give Scout latitude to get this off the ground. All of us here are proud of the fact that we are an American company and will build our vehicles in Blythewood, South Carolina. There are numerous reasons and incentives to source as many parts and materials from the region as well.. Lastly we are respectful of the history, in awe of the legacy and couldn't be more proud to have the opportunity to bring the next-generation Scout to market.

This team just gets better and better every week. We can't wait to start showing some of the things we are working on.

Thanks again for the note! 🍻
This is incredible news and I cannot wait to get my hands on one of these. Thank you so much!
 
I hope American products are a vital part but sadly, with that comes higher costs. I’ll cautiously add that if EV’s can be built with out unions driving costs and just pay Scout’s workforce fairly that would go along way. If it’s a more employee owned company/mindset there is greater opportunity to create a better product, work environment and drive initiatives to build and grow great AMERICAN MADE products at costs that Americans can afford.
Scott/Jamie and the other core VW folks took a big chance stepping away from VW’s nurture to start Scout so I know they want this to succeed but I also know there is HUGE buying power that comes with VW so it will be interesting to see how the business side manages all those particulars.
Perhaps with a new car company approach that is Scout there is a new opportunity to find vendors and trade partners that aren’t in the auto industry but have all the capabilities to produce parts and pieces and could become more directly attached to Scout rather than sourcing everything simply as commodity based items where the only goal is having the procurement teams trying to bankrupt their suppliers beating out every last penny. (My dad’s career was procurement with New Holland farm equipment and over time as they were bought out by the bigger companies [including Fiat at one point] they only cared about that exact item-the bottom line). Figuring out a more symbiotic approach as a new EV car company could change the way all vehicles are produced and continue to allow more American companies to compete in this segment and many others. The Scout is a different vehicle with an unusual history and legacy. It is one of the first of its kind to be reincarnated and have a cult-like following. This opens the doors to all kinds of possibilities if approached in the proper way
 
After that long rant I thought of something. What if the first edition model was called the Pheonix. Think about it. The vehicle was killed off. Now it’s being brought back with flaming hot steel and machinery.
“Out of the ashes….”
Could even design a cool graphic for decals.
Is Scout Motors the first to do this? I know BMW started with planes, then cars and then revamped the company to be luxury cars but has a car/truck ever been resurrected in the history of automotive production? Anybody here know?
 
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After that long rant I thought of something. What if the first edition model was called the Pheonix. Think about it. The vehicle was killed off. Now it’s being brought back with flaming hot steel and machinery.
“Out of the ashes….”
Could even design a cool graphic for decals.
Is Scout Motors the first to do this? I know BMW started with planes, then cars and then revamped the company to be luxury cars but has a car/truck ever been resurrected in the history of automotive production? Anybody here know?

If SM is good to their word about respecting the heritage of the IH Scout, simply naming them Scout III will bring the honour and recognition it deserves. Yesterday I trailered my Scout 80 across the Adirondacks from Ontario to Massachusetts, at almost every stop people recognized it and had tales to tell; Scout still lives in the minds of folks young and old. The customs inspectors gave it extra detailed (friendly) inspections in both directions.
 
Back when the news was first announced that VW would be producing a new scout I was uninterested because it was not going to be an IH product.

A bit about me: I have owned a 79 scout II, which my dad and I restored in high school. My dad has owned 9+ scouts since I have been alive (I am 25). I grew up on the trails and in the garage in these, the smell of gas immediately makes me think of the backseat of a Scout. My dad was former president of the local scout clubs, and we still attend the big events every year. I have an IH tractor I restored in college, and I want an IH 1456 FWA tractor soon enough.

Part of the reason my dad and I loved these old vehicles is because they were American-made. Nothing against anything imported, I have plenty of friends who love their imports and I think they are quite cool- but I get a great sense of pride owning a vehicle that is from here. Everything I buy is American made - clothes, shoes, silverware, glassware, my mattress, toothbrush, vehicles, anything I buy, and that is because of growing up and feeding off my dads passion for the American-made scout.

Fun fact about the originals - everything from the mines, to the casting factories, to the assembly line was (for the most-part) owned by International Harvester. So the Scout was American steel, from American mines, built by American hands.

Once I found out the scout was going to be made here again, I was immediately interested. I have nothing against VW at all, my wife's dream car is an old 60s van, but to stay true to it's heritage, I think the scout should try their best to be independent. Meaning their own branded owner's manuals, logos, decals, etc. No VW on the car, especially since Scout Motors is technically operating as their own company. When I read a Motortrend review in 2027, I want to see the Scout Motor's Scout.... not the VW Scout.

I cannot speak for anyone else on this forum, but I know that the people that attend the local scout club in eastern Washington (at least most of the original members from 20+ years ago) would agree with this. A lot of them have worked for International, then Navistar. A lot of them own old IH products that are not scouts (tractors, cream separators, hit-n-miss engines, M1's, hand-tools, refrigerators, etc.). IH has it's own legacy that I hope Scout Motor's tries to continue.

Additionally, I like how proud the new Ford Bronco is to be built in America. My dad has a 2-door sasquatch. It has an American-flag on the shifter, it has a sticker on the windshield that says "Built with Pride at the Michigan Assembly Plant", and it has the VIN plate near the center-console, which says "Made in Detroit, Michigan USA" on it.

These are the kinds of things I hope Scout Motors does to separate themselves from VW. I know they are independent companies, like Fiat owned Chrysler and Ram and they were independent, and had no design correlations. But then again Ford owns Lincoln, and they use almost all of the same components for their cars.
I support your wish for totally American made. But I'll be happy if it is close to the goal. Right now the USA does not hold the top seat in all the necessary minerals and technologies. And we all know that some raw materials and companies making parts are stretched to their limits. So Scout Motors is starting up in a turbulent worldwide marketplace. I'd be happy to see all the iron and plastic and fabric honour the IH tradition and be North American made.