No regenerative braking!!!!!!!

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roitan

Member
Apr 23, 2024
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As as scout and tesla model y owner I sold shortly after , this was what i hated most! Or atleast be able to turn it off. I control the car and what features it has, not the other way around!!
 
Absolutely love it. When I get into an ICE car or truck it is mindblowing how inefficient it feels to constantly be braking when you could be regenerating. It doesn't feel much different from engine braking when you downshift in a standard (also efficient). Its just like driving one-pedal in a golf cart. Took me about 5 minutes to get used to it when I first got my truck.

I actually never use my brakes. My service advisor told me to go out to a parking lot and use the brakes for hard stops 20 times each month. He wants to make sure I keep the brakes functional by using them. That is how good the regen is in the R1T. And yes, you can set the regen to LOW. You can also adjust it based on drive modes. For example, if I am in snow-mode, regen is reduced to improve traction / decrease slip.
 
It takes getting used to for sure. I am ok with some levels of regen but the tesla was extremely aggressive. Even once I got used to it, there were still many times that it proved to be an inconvenience. Like on the highway at 80, pulling off accelerator just for a moment to adjust, or in a moment of a vehicle ahead passing, i dont want the vehicle to aggressively brake then. I want to coast for a hot second. Atleast I want to be able to control whether or not my vehicle does that. If possible! or is it an inherent side effect of all EV's in general?

Another thought on getting used to it. If it is your sole method of transportation, you do. but if you own multiple vehicles , still have a gas car for long range driving, or your wife has a family hauler etc.. you never fully adjust. But then again I only owned my tesla i bought new for a few months before selling it. Maybe it is different after a year.
 
Absolutely love it. When I get into an ICE car or truck it is mindblowing how inefficient it feels to constantly be braking when you could be regenerating. It doesn't feel much different from engine braking when you downshift in a standard (also efficient). Its just like driving one-pedal in a golf cart. Took me about 5 minutes to get used to it when I first got my truck.

I actually never use my brakes. My service advisor told me to go out to a parking lot and use the brakes for hard stops 20 times each month. He wants to make sure I keep the brakes functional by using them. That is how good the regen is in the R1T. And yes, you can set the regen to LOW. You can also adjust it based on drive modes. For example, if I am in snow-mode, regen is reduced to improve traction / decrease slip.
See, thats good you can adjust it. my tesla was just all out regen aggressive all of the time. it was terrible!
 
Another thought on getting used to it. If it is your sole method of transportation, you do. but if you own multiple vehicles , still have a gas car for long range driving, or your wife has a family hauler etc.. you never fully adjust. But then again I only owned my tesla i bought new for a few months before selling it. Maybe it is different after a year.
It's no different than adjusting to standard or automatic. I drive both, its the same thing... As soon as you start driving you know what to expect.
 
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It's no different than adjusting to standard or automatic. I drive both, its the same thing... As soon as you start driving you know what to expect.
I suppose everyone has different tastes. I just want to be able to control it. I dont care if it significantly reduces range. I want the truck to feel how i want it to feel. I dont want to understand why it feels the way it does or have to compromise based on "oh its an EV" so it does that.

Maybe there can be a simulated "coast" feature in the software that makes the EV coast like a gas car.
That would be super cool..
 
Fair that it takes getting used to and the ability to adjust it is available on most EVs. It seems though that most people seem to really like it once they get used to it.
One of my biggest pet peeves is folks conflating “regenerative braking” with “one pedal driving”. Regen just means recapturing some of your kinetic energy and using it to slow down the car and slightly recharge the batteries. This can be triggered in many ways, including by tapping the brake pedal, or a special lever, or, in the case of one pedal driving by taking your foot off the gas. The best implementation I’ve seen is the Hyundai/kia regen paddles which allow easy adjustment from coasting to one pedal driving with several levels in between. And while of course regen is more efficient than physical braking only, it is not more efficient than coasting, another common misconception that seems to get propagated a lot.

In my experience, one pedal driving is tedious as you have to carefully modulate the gas pedal to avoid making people seasick. My natural tendency is to take my foot off the gas and get ready to hit the brakes when I’m preparing to slow down, or if there’s uncertainty ahead. In a one pedal only car, this is like suddenly slamming the brakes. I’m with Porsche, in favor of “one pedal braking”, ie a good “blended braking” implementation is far more important to me.

But as long as it’s so easy to give people a choice, please be like Kia/hyundai and make it easy for the driver to choose, don’t force one pedal driving on people. It’s fine for those who like it (though not so much for their passengers 😋), but please let the rest of us be free of it and don’t assume that we’ll “get used to it”.
 
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In my experience, one pedal driving is tedious as you have to carefully modulate the gas pedal to avoid making people seasick. My natural tendency is to take my foot off the gas and get ready to hit the brakes when I’m preparing to slow down, or if there’s uncertainty ahead. In a one pedal only car, this is like suddenly slamming the brakes.

100% 100% 100% !!!!!!!


But as long as it’s so easy to give people a choice, please be like Kia/hyundai and make it easy for the driver to choose, don’t force one pedal driving on people. It’s fine for those who like it (though not so much for their passengers 😋), but please let the rest of us be free of it and don’t assume that we’ll “get used to it”.
well written and well said! "Keep It Affordable" taking it to new heights over here. i have a lot of audi customers that end up buying palisades lol
 
Tesla invented one pedal driving so they didn’t have to spend money providing blended braking. Using blended braking (ie just driving the usual way) is more efficient and more comfortable for the passengers. But one pedal is popular, so having both is best.
 
All depends on how it is implemented. Some people have a really hard time with change. LOL.

But, if implemented correctly and you give customers choice or at least different settings or levels for regen, then you are in the money.
 
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One of my biggest pet peeves is folks conflating “regenerative braking” with “one pedal driving”. Regen just means recapturing some of your kinetic energy and using it to slow down the car and slightly recharge the batteries. This can be triggered in many ways, including by tapping the brake pedal, or a special lever, or, in the case of one pedal driving by taking your foot off the gas. The best implementation I’ve seen is the Hyundai/kia regen paddles which allow easy adjustment from coasting to one pedal driving with several levels in between. And while of course regen is more efficient than physical braking only, it is not more efficient than coasting, another common misconception that seems to get propagated a lot.

In my experience, one pedal driving is tedious as you have to carefully modulate the gas pedal to avoid making people seasick. My natural tendency is to take my foot off the gas and get ready to hit the brakes when I’m preparing to slow down, or if there’s uncertainty ahead. In a one pedal only car, this is like suddenly slamming the brakes. I’m with Porsche, in favor of “one pedal braking”, ie a good “blended braking” implementation is far more important to me.

But as long as it’s so easy to give people a choice, please be like Kia/hyundai and make it easy for the driver to choose, don’t force one pedal driving on people. It’s fine for those who like it (though not so much for their passengers 😋), but please let the rest of us be free of it and don’t assume that we’ll “get used to it”.
I have no problem with regenerative braking or regenerative anything. First Cub Cadets from IHC I grew up on combined starter and generator into a single unit.

I am leery however of single pedal since how do you slam on the brakes. By rocking the pedal into "reverse " with diminished foot power and control? If it were a tractor or mower with single pedal hydrostatic you would instantly be in reverse full speed which is dangerous in traffic to say the least
 
Have you experienced 1-pedal driving? You let the regen do a lot of the braking for you, but you can still smash the brake if needed. You still have an accelerator and a brake. The term "Single-Pedal" (as it relates to EV's) is used primarily to describe a style of driving with regen... You just typically don;t need to use the brakes much at all. And, if you want to go into reverse, you still need to stop, shift to reverse, then use the accelerator to move backwards.
 
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Have you experienced 1-pedal driving? You let the regen do a lot of the braking for you, but you can still smash the brake if needed. You still have an accelerator and a brake. The term "Single-Pedal" (as it relates to EV's) is used primarily to describe a style of driving with regen... You just typically don;t need to use the brakes much at all. And, if you want to go into reverse, you still need to stop, shift to reverse, then use the accelerator to move backwards.
Yes, I’ve tried several times and I really, really dislike it. It’s like driving a manual stuck in first gear. I’ve driven hybrids with decent blended braking for 20 years, dunno why Tesla couldn’t get that to work. One pedal is really completely orthogonal to regen. You can use regen just fine without one pedal driving. I don’t want the Car to hit the brakes for me just because I take my foot off the gas; I want it to coast until I hit the brakes (which is also more efficient than braking, regen or otherwise).
I’ve been driving a long time, and one basic instinct is to take my foot off the pedal whenever there’s uncertainty ahead, and be ready to hit the brakes if needed. In a one pedal system, that act results in essentially slamming the brakes which can be really unsafe.
Consumer reports often mentions that while some drivers like opd, few passengers do because it takes careful modulation of the gas pedal to avoid jerky driving.
If someone likes it, that’s fine (though I may not want to be a passenger unless they’re really smooth drivers), but it should be something that the driver can easily adjust, not something forced on the customer.
 
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Sounds like you have experienced a poor implementation, so I do understand the concern. When it comes to lifting your foot all the way off the pedal, my truck will do the same - you will start to decelerate with regen immediately. If it is set to HIGH REGEN, it is powerful and impressive how quickly it will decelerate. HOWEVER, you can leave your foot in a neutral position and ride the line between regen and power consumption, or you can modulate your pressure on the pedal and slow smoothly. On longer stretches of HWY, the truck basically drives itself, so it is not even a consideration once you lock-into Driver Assist mode. You also made my point - I easily adjusted to it within minutes of taking delivery (and have come to really like it more than supremely inefficient ICE braking). Probably b/c it was implemented well. Even with a good implementation, you are always going to have people complain and ask for things exactly as they were. It's just human nature.

I guess the other thing that is interesting is how you can set preferences for things like regen, with specific drive modes. If you are in CONSERVE mode in your truck and you are trying to maximize efficiency, the default setting for conserve will be to move regen to HIGH. With more pedal sensitivity in a mode like SPORT for example, HIGH regen feels bad (to your point), so the default setting for regen in SPORT mode in my truck is set to STANDARD. I'm sure when manufacturers are spec'ing out their modes and giving range estimates, it also works in their favor to be able to say you get XXX____ miles in CONSERVE mode on XXX ____ wheels and tires... The assumption being that the truck is lowered, regen is HIGH and you are only running 2 motors instead of 4 (in my case).

At the end of the day, totally agree that driver configurability is key, but there are many benefits to regen as you consider driver settings and EV efficiency.
 
I like the implementation on my Cadillac ELR (PHEV). In “D” it has very mild regen when you lift off the accelerator, allowing the car to coast. It has paddles on the back of the steering wheel like shifter paddles but when you squeeze either one, it engages full regen. The shifter also has “L” which is like one pedal driving if that’s what you want ( I don’t). I use those paddles for almost all my braking. I do wish those paddles could modulate, they are all or nothing.
 
I like the implementation on my Cadillac ELR (PHEV). In “D” it has very mild regen when you lift off the accelerator, allowing the car to coast. It has paddles on the back of the steering wheel like shifter paddles but when you squeeze either one, it engages full regen. The shifter also has “L” which is like one pedal driving if that’s what you want ( I don’t). I use those paddles for almost all my braking. I do wish those paddles could modulate, they are all or nothing.
I’m a fan of this option. I like paddle shifting and this seems to blend best of all worlds
 
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Have you experienced 1-pedal driving? You let the regen do a lot of the braking for you, but you can still smash the brake if needed. You still have an accelerator and a brake. The term "Single-Pedal" (as it relates to EV's) is used primarily to describe a style of driving with regen... You just typically don;t need to use the brakes much at all. And, if you want to go into reverse, you still need to stop, shift to reverse, then use the accelerator to move backwards.
Then for those of us who are specific brained they should not label it "single pedal" if there are 2 pedals.
 
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Paddles are great if you like driving with your hands at 10 & 2 all the time, but not so great if you like driving with 1 hand. Therefore, another reason to have options.

As far as "single pedal" goes, that is just a description used by many EV owners for a driving style (not necessarily for a product feature). When you are driving and using more regen, you might go for miles and miles without ever hitting the brake. That style of driving is considered single pedal driving, even though your brake pedal is right there next to your foot... When you come to a stop with regen, the vehicle will automatically go into HOLD. When in hold, the vehicle automatically utlizes your braking system, once you come to a stop. You don't put your foot on the brake though.... As soon as a light turns green, or you decide to move forward and hit the accelerator, you are out of HOLD automatically.
 
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It’s like driving a manual stuck in first gear.
Yep, that's it!

And even if there are two pedals, if you are in the habit of assuming 1 pedal deceleration is enough you might get caught out if you actually do need to apply the brake for maximum stoppage. I imagine we're just at the start of a new generation of 1 pedal drivers who have literally have never used the brake pedal and have no instinct for stomping on the brakes in an emergency. Really the only thing it has going for it is that it's novel and it's cheaper to manufacture the car (for auto makers that don't include blended braking). Cons are it's less efficient, it's less comfortable and it's less safe.