Ideas for the scout pickup

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I just feel like that the scout pickup has a similarity with the vw atlas. For example the bumper: it has those air vent things in the bumper. I personally don’t like these vents in the bumper. I wish it had a bumper like the bronco. To me that would make it look more closer to the original scout.
 
My battery pack weighs in at 1750 LBS. I don't think anyone is going to let an owner swap their own, not to mention the infrastructure required to pick up a new one. I do like the new Landcruiser headlights though
 
My battery pack weighs in at 1750 LBS. I don't think anyone is going to let an owner swap their own, not to mention the infrastructure required to pick up a new one. I do like the new Landcruiser headlights though
Not in your driveway, but swappable batteries are feasible, but usually associated with a battery rental model. Could be interesting if the original purchase were $10k cheaper due to not having to pay for the battery.
 
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It would be a cool Idea if they could make the battery easy to replace. If the ground clearance was tall enough for a person to perform a battery drop themselves. My idea was for the suv to have a lock-out tag-out switch system to make sure the power was turned off. And then the battery would disconnect from the car automatically or have a manual lever switch to disconnect the battery by hand.
It would be awesome if a person could perform a battery swap on their own.
Battery swapping stations like Jiffylube are definitely going to be a thing.
 
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I would say it’s a little different. Having purchased a Bronco (and I agree with @R1TVT that it will likely be problematic) I think the Bronco line-up has more than enough options in the standard line-up. The Raptor is no different on Bronco than on the F-150. It’s a high end niche vehicle for a very specific group of buyers. My daughter loves the original raptor but had no interest in a Raptor Bronco. The general range of Broncos has a $15-$20K-ish price spread which is reasonable. Ineos, Bollinger and I’ll even say Range Rover are more in line with showing a “base” price then getting an ideal set-up runs 40% or more in increase. I love the Bollinger SUV but as you guys both noted, the end sales price would likely be significantly higher if not double the base price. What Ford did right and hopefully SM’s does as well is gives a mix of end user vehicle types within a reasonable price spread. Granted the other companies are selling exclusivity and those buyers are happy/able to double the price. Most of us don’t have that luxury. Those who want/need a Scout Reaper can or will find a way of justifying $90k+ but my hunch is 95% of buyers will live between $50-65k when it’s all said and done
There are Toyota dealers bemoaning the Tundras sitting on their lots: unhappy that Toyota had decided to follow the upscale sizing and packaging of the King Ranch sort. Customers are wanting the Tacoma for it's smaller size and less expensive packaging. The 24 Tacoma which is about to hit their lots is following the bigger and higher trend just like the smaller trucks of the other makers. Government requirements play a role, but the dealers are finding buyers unwilling to spend $80K for a $55K truck - and the appeal of the luxury is being tested by their pocketbooks. In the past I have made the point here that the American manufacturers are ignoring a very important market, the small to mid-sized pickup that is a true service vehicle used in everyday work. I had considered it a niche product, now I'm hearing it's in demand. There's a reason that all those people fighting wars are using the utility versions of the Hilux. We need a simple rugged pickup that we can reach into the bed without standing on a step-stool, and we don't mind driving with muddy boots.

When I worked as a geologist with my Scout 80 I tracked in lots of junk on my boots from construction sites, to mountains, to farms. To clean the footwells I could throw the rubber mats on the lawn, pop a couple of drain hole plugs under the seats, gab a hose and be done in a few minutes. Those drain holes were pretty helpful after fording some streams, too. I would hope that the SM Pickup will have that market in mind - at least in the base model before the "packages" get added on.
 
Battery swapping stations like Jiffylube are definitely going to be a thing.
Just don't hold your breath, its hard enough to get a new DCFC in place to expand the charging network. And since no trucks enable battery swapping on the fly as you suggest, you are fighting a chicken and egg battle. With longer range trucks, better BMS and faster charging you are essentially obfuscating the need for a battery swap. No OEM is going to sell a truck without an initial battery pack anytime soon, bc it would be a massive paperweight. That type of subscription model would require interoperability between OEM's and batteries (serious design considerations) thousands of on-line locations spread across the country in order to be effective, with zero profit for an incredibly long time. It is a tough financial model in terms of start a fly wheel - particularly in light of real estate costs and interest rates. It is also serving an edge case, since 90% of the time you will just charge at home or at a local DCFC. Most people do not chunk travel frequently into multiple 300-400 mile segments (range). Sure, on a road trip you do, but that is not the nominal use-case for a typical driver.
 
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When I worked as a geologist with my Scout 80 I tracked in lots of junk on my boots from construction sites, to mountains, to farms. To clean the footwells I could throw the rubber mats on the lawn, pop a couple of drain hole plugs under the seats, gab a hose and be done in a few minutes. Those drain holes were pretty helpful after fording some streams, too. I would hope that the SM Pickup will have that market in mind - at least in the base model before the "packages" get added on.

There is definitely a market for that sized truck. The drain hole thing is an issue with a battery pack riding underneath. You would need side scuppers, not as great for drainage. With an EV you are going to have pretty flat floors. The all-weather rubber mats available these days are super easy to clean and work well. I would expect that the SM trucks will have some well designed rubber mats that are super easy to remove and hose off too.
 
Dumb question but as a reminder that battery packs are almost certainly going to be on the bottom-how do you manage moisture and especially mud infiltration when you have drivers who will go mud bogging which will encase the entire underbody of the vehicle?
I get that the batteries aren’t just hanging on the bottom but for serious mud work how does that get addressed for a long term wear and tear?
 
They are completely enclosed and watertight. The harness and cabling is also protected. This is what enables extreme wading depths (for example). In addition, you may have added composite protection that can cover the entire pack (as an underbody / armor / protection option). Munro did a breakdown on the R1T pack I believe if you search youtube.
 
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They are completely enclosed and watertight. The harness and cabling is also protected. This is what enables extreme wading depths (for example). In addition, you may have added composite protection that can cover the entire pack (as an underbody / armor / protection option). Munro did a breakdown on the R1T pack I believe if you search youtube.
Thank you sir. Assumed all that but since I’m ignorant (slowly learning) I wanted someone intelligent to clarify
 
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One thing I really like is the built in tool boxes some of the RAM trucks have in the bed. It's dead space but a great way to keep a few tools, parts, etc. Having one be an ice chest is a nice idea too (with a drain). One of these could have a 120V outlet fed off the truck battery to charge tools, etc too.
 
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One thing I really like is the built in tool boxes some of the RAM trucks have in the bed. It's dead space but a great way to keep a few tools, parts, etc. Having one be an ice chest is a nice idea too (with a drain). One of these could have a 120V outlet fed off the truck battery to charge tools, etc too.
And speaking about power outlets in the back of a pickup. I recently observed a pickup (brand has slipped my recollection) that had the power outlet in the bed located far forward on the sidewall. The sides so high that anyone shorter than an NBA player could never reach over and plug something in, and that left the option of getting out you ladder to climb up to the lailgate and walk forward to it's location. I know that doesn't apply to you suggestion of in-toolbox outlets, but the principles of easy access apply, so yours needs to be high enough that it's not buried behind the accumulated layer of tools.
 
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It would be a cool Idea if they could make the battery easy to replace. If the ground clearance was tall enough for a person to perform a battery drop themselves. My idea was for the suv to have a lock-out tag-out switch system to make sure the power was turned off. And then the battery would disconnect from the car automatically or have a manual lever switch to disconnect the battery by hand.
It would be awesome if a person could perform a battery swap on their own.
I am a battery repair tech with VW - most time consuming part of removing ID4 battery is all the safety stuff to make sure we don't accidentally kill ourselves (same as why charging the car is so complicated, but that's another story). 2 coolant quick connects, 4 electrical connectors that unlatch in <30 seconds, a row of bolts around perimeter and 4 middle bolts, then battery drops out. Oh, and several plastic trim pieces that make sure smooth air flow have to be removed. There is a green disconnect/lock out plug under the hood - pull insert out and install padlock in provided hole makes car safe to handle.

Not too time consuming unless you mention that VW wants you in a high voltage safety suit (think bomb squad guy).

I'm looking forward to newer battery tech being available and upgrading. Drop old 1500lb 82Kw battery to install new 800lb 90Kw battery for example....
 
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I think that having the ability to drop out or remove the battery would be a good idea for replacing old or damaged batteries. Maybe not for swapping stations but more for the technicians who work on ev’s.
 
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I am a battery repair tech with VW - most time consuming part of removing ID4 battery is all the safety stuff to make sure we don't accidentally kill ourselves (same as why charging the car is so complicated, but that's another story). 2 coolant quick connects, 4 electrical connectors that unlatch in <30 seconds, a row of bolts around perimeter and 4 middle bolts, then battery drops out. Oh, and several plastic trim pieces that make sure smooth air flow have to be removed. There is a green disconnect/lock out plug under the hood - pull insert out and install padlock in provided hole makes car safe to handle.

Not too time consuming unless you mention that VW wants you in a high voltage safety suit (think bomb squad guy).

I'm looking forward to newer battery tech being available and upgrading. Drop old 1500lb 82Kw battery to install new 800lb 90Kw battery for example....
That would be a nice idea to have the ability to upgrade the battery. I don’t want the scout to be ridiculously hard to get work done on it. I just feel like I don’t want to see a new Scout go to waste in the future when it gets old.