Frunk Focus

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As I was filling up my wife's washer fluid on a windy day, causing some of it spill around opening, I thought to myself this would potentially be more of an issue if she had her dresses laid across the top of her suit cases in the frunk on a road trip. Some of this issue comes from the fact that you have to start pouring at the height of the full gallon jug. Maybe look at designing a funnel that stores with in neck of the washer fluid container. You simply pull it up (about a foot or so) and it snaps to hold itself up. Putting the pour spout closer to the required height to start pour would hopefully limit any mess within the frunk.

Side note: also make sure the washer fluid container holds a little more than a gallon. Some vehicles from my past didn't, making you throw away some of the washer fluid, or have it thrown around in the trunk.
 
Maybe a frunk storage comartment that is designed to house the Scout Motors towing bar. Keeps it consealed as well as strapped down. Also with it potentially being dirty, it keeps other items stored in the frunk on a road trip from getting dirty.

Post in thread 'Trailer / Towing Discussion' https://scoutmotors.community.forum/threads/trailer-towing-discussion.144/post-3635
J Alynn had the idea of putting the spare tire in there and I think that is a very cool idea. He also mentioned the grill dropping down so it could slide out, also a cool idea (as long as it fits 35s;)). I think it would also be cool to have the jack in there, maybe a small air compressor (even a small portable one would be cool), maybe tow straps, a flare, etc. You could call it the ICE Box. In this scenario it stands for the "In Case of Emergency" box, but it is funny because it would be where old ICE vehicles had the engine.
 
As I was filling up my wife's washer fluid on a windy day, causing some of it spill around opening, I thought to myself this would potentially be more of an issue if she had her dresses laid across the top of her suit cases in the frunk on a road trip. Some of this issue comes from the fact that you have to start pouring at the height of the full gallon jug. Maybe look at designing a funnel that stores with in neck of the washer fluid container. You simply pull it up (about a foot or so) and it snaps to hold itself up. Putting the pour spout closer to the required height to start pour would hopefully limit any mess within the frunk.

Side note: also make sure the washer fluid container holds a little more than a gallon. Some vehicles from my past didn't, making you throw away some of the washer fluid, or have it thrown around in the trunk.
It should be easy in designing an entirely new vehicle to locate the fill points (for washer fluid and anything else) such that there is clear space adjacent that allow for the standard bottle or can to pour directly. The extension funnel is a cute idea, but really just a cover for inadequate consideration of the owner's convenience in performing routine maintenance tasks.

There is a book, written some decades ago by a MIT professor (details gone from my memory) that tells the tale of a major auto manufacturer which retired a lot of long term highly paid designers and replaced them with fresh engineering grads. The next generation of cars were nightmares to maintain and repair. The analysis basically discovered that unlike the dismissed older team the young guys had never had the life experiences of tearing down and repairing their own bicycles, and lawn-mowers, toys, etc. on the sidewalk where they failed. In short they were missing the practical side of repair and maintenance.

I applaud SM for creating this forum where real Scout owners can speak from their true life experiences derived from their Scout. Sometimes I worry that we get sidetracked into comparing "features" with the other new vehicles which are our daily drivers and miss chances to relay seemingly simplistic but very practical design considerations from our daily experience. Having fill tubes in spots accessible to standard bottles fits right in with having the rear-view mirror mount slender enough for Handicapped Hang Tags, standard attachment points for running boards, heated light and sensor covers that will shed ice/snow, dash switches not hidden behind steering wheel spokes, and convenient access to the fuse box to add new circuits for accessories (lights, winch, power tonneau, etc.). SM has said they will be producing vehicles which approach the ruggedness and independence of our originals, that implies forethought to the home garage mechanics and the wilderness trailside mechanics who will want and need to maintain and repair them.
 
It should be easy in designing an entirely new vehicle to locate the fill points (for washer fluid and anything else) such that there is clear space adjacent that allow for the standard bottle or can to pour directly. The extension funnel is a cute idea, but really just a cover for inadequate consideration of the owner's convenience in performing routine maintenance tasks.

There is a book, written some decades ago by a MIT professor (details gone from my memory) that tells the tale of a major auto manufacturer which retired a lot of long term highly paid designers and replaced them with fresh engineering grads. The next generation of cars were nightmares to maintain and repair. The analysis basically discovered that unlike the dismissed older team the young guys had never had the life experiences of tearing down and repairing their own bicycles, and lawn-mowers, toys, etc. on the sidewalk where they failed. In short they were missing the practical side of repair and maintenance.

I applaud SM for creating this forum where real Scout owners can speak from their true life experiences derived from their Scout. Sometimes I worry that we get sidetracked into comparing "features" with the other new vehicles which are our daily drivers and miss chances to relay seemingly simplistic but very practical design considerations from our daily experience. Having fill tubes in spots accessible to standard bottles fits right in with having the rear-view mirror mount slender enough for Handicapped Hang Tags, standard attachment points for running boards, heated light and sensor covers that will shed ice/snow, dash switches not hidden behind steering wheel spokes, and convenient access to the fuse box to add new circuits for accessories (lights, winch, power tonneau, etc.). SM has said they will be producing vehicles which approach the ruggedness and independence of our originals, that implies forethought to the home garage mechanics and the wilderness trailside mechanics who will want and need to maintain and repair them.
The rear view mirror is a brilliant observation. Just used a parking pass this fall for a PSU game and it tore the second we tried to hook it on the mirror. I’m guessing with the Homelink power controls and mass to hold mirror that “stem” probably grew over the years until your observation is spot on and consideration should be given to try and thin it out. Your other thoughts are solid too
 
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Maybe on some models do away with the frunk.in favor of a cab forward or van design. A frunk is created because designers cannot think outside the traditional 3 box design. Engine bay- passenger bay-luggage bay.
 
Radical !!!! You must be one of those people my Mother warned me about. That said, it is truly time for some thinking outside the box (or three boxes). Now as we transition from fossil fuels to alternatives, and congestion in cities demands new modes of both mass and personal transportation we see government and the automotive industry doggedly trying to patch a fundamental design which is approaching the end of it's useful life. As valid as your concepts are I seriously doubt the Safety Nannies will ever again allow a cab forward design, nor will the general public find it acceptable. Thus for Scout Motors and all the others trying to conceive new vehicles I believe they shall be constrained to the three box idiom.

But there is a fundamental reason for the three-box design. We all like the smoothest ride possible, and by placing the mass of the driver (and front seat occupant(s)) as close to the center of rotation of the vehicle that goal is best accomplished. We are quite adapted to ignore the slight rotational motions at that point.
 
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Point somewhat taken as all minivans currently available provide a crush zone with a small engine bay.

But hear me out as to the use of the frunk.

Add one 500# battery in the frunk, for balance add an additional 500# battery in the bed and other than you are carrying around an extra 1000# you have immediately doubled your range compared to base unit with one 1000# battery.

For someone whose nearest out of town grandkids are 600 miles away I just made a non-stop drive possible. An EV with a projected range of 300 miles, which is unfortunately the average still, needs recharged every 200-225 miles and more often through the hills of WV, whereas my ICE BMW SUV can make the same trip with a single 5 minute fillup.

Granted a Scout EV would not be designed for long road trips but nor is any currently available EV
 
Point somewhat taken as all minivans currently available provide a crush zone with a small engine bay.

But hear me out as to the use of the frunk.

Add one 500# battery in the frunk, for balance add an additional 500# battery in the bed and other than you are carrying around an extra 1000# you have immediately doubled your range compared to base unit with one 1000# battery.

For someone whose nearest out of town grandkids are 600 miles away I just made a non-stop drive possible. An EV with a projected range of 300 miles, which is unfortunately the average still, needs recharged every 200-225 miles and more often through the hills of WV, whereas my ICE BMW SUV can make the same trip with a single 5 minute fillup.

Granted a Scout EV would not be designed for long road trips but nor is any currently available EV
But this is not accurate - if you double the weight of the battery it will NOT double your range - its not linear, and there will be other trade-offs to consider...

You will increase vehicle weight,
Lose acceleration
Lose storage
Increase charge times
See different handling characteristics
Increase tire wear
Etc.

The biggest trade-off might be cost. Many of the deltas on battery size are in coming increments of an additional $10K in vehicle cost to the customer.